Let’s step back in time

In a previous post I said I would continue our travels….

So after finding the grave markers I have driven by many times right in front of the state park entrance, i decided to go to another familiar place.

The entrance to Fort Bonnesboro
The entrance to Fort Bonnesboro

This is not going to be a lot of my narrative, I’ll let the pictures describe the life here.  So let’s begin…

The self guided fort tour begins with a video presentation describing the events in history that took place in the fort and surrounding areas.
The self guided fort tour begins with a video presentation describing the events in history that took place in the fort and surrounding areas.
a view of the inside of the fort
a view of the inside of the fort
a view of the inside of the fort
a view of the inside of the fort

The fort has many “timeline cabins” that describe the lives and work of the people who came here.  There will be a slide of the cabin’s “timeline” card as we proceed inside.

In the first cabin we see life was not more than the barest of essentials.
In the first cabin we see life was not more than the barest of essentials.

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A few more things to make life easier
A few more things to make life easier

Let’s watch a demonstration of one of the everyday skills that often meant survival to the early settlers.

Not only could you start your fire with flint but it also produced the spark that allowed you to fire your gun.
Not only did flint help start your fires, it’s what provided the spark to fire your weapon.

 

How about a quick trip to the garden…

Planting and harvesting was skills children learned at an earlier age, to be productive community  members in adulthood.
Planting and harvesting was skills children learned at an earlier age, to be productive community members in adulthood.

Everyone helped with all of the “chores ” around the fort.  Including defending the fort when it came under seige.  But, that’s a story for later…

They are attempting to "civilize" the otherwise wild west.
They are attempting to “civilize” the otherwise wild west, yes Kan-tuck-kee was the western most area at this time.
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LIfe is becoming a little easier.
Next we'll see how fabric was made from wool, natural fibers, and even other animals fur.
Next we’ll see how fabric was made from wool, natural fibers, and even other animals fur.

A couple of demonsetrations…

A piece that was made on the loom here at Boonesboro
A piece that was made on the loom here at Boonesboro
Alittle closer look
A little closer look

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The area where gatherings to decide what the future may bring may have happened.
The area where gatherings to decide what the future may bring may have happened.
And of course there's the merchant's store area.
And of course there’s the merchant’s store area.
My favorite cabin timeline, maybe because of my upbringing...
My favorite cabin timeline, maybe because of my upbringing…
Notice the spring pole lathe.
Notice the spring pole lathe.
A shot of some of the tools including a foot treadle lathe
A shot of some of the tools including a foot treadle lathe
An important job was that of surveyor and claims officer.
An important job was that of surveyor and claims officer.

 

Early tools of the trade of land surveyor
Early tools of the trade of land surveyor

 

Some of the tools of soapmaking.
Some of the tools of soapmaking.

And what did they do when the sun went down?   Why lit candles of course.

Hand dipped candles, then there were also candles made in a mold.
Hand dipped candles, then there were also candles made in a mold.
During the process of dipping candles were hung on a rack until cool enough for the next dip.
During the process of dipping candles were hung on a rack until cool enough for the next dip.
IF you make candles when it's windy or raining they just don't turn out so pretty.
IF you make candles when it’s windy or raining they just don’t turn out so pretty.
The next stop is one of my favorites...  the blacksmith.
The next stop is one of my favorites… the blacksmith.

The blacksmith showing the "S" hook he made during the video.
The blacksmith showing the “S” hook he made during the video.

Well the blacksmith’s shed wraps up my tour of Fort Boonesboro.

And since I’ve been sitting in the shade in their parking lot writing this post I’ve come to realize that living everywhere has some real advantages over living somewhere.

 

Once again guys…

Get out, Be safe, and Go adventure.

 

2 thoughts on “Let’s step back in time”

  1. I love living history museum. If fact I love history. One day go up to Detroit’s Bloomfield village if ya get the chance. I would love to work in a place like that.you find the coolest places to go. Ill say it again I live in the wrong part of the country.

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