Category Archives: Travels

From Atlanta to the Coast…

We’ve been on the road full-time for over two months now. And loving it! Which explains partly why this blog is so far behind in posts. You see we’ve been so busy living the life I’ve been just a little negligent writing about the life. DSC_0980 I’ll try to do better.
We left Kennesaw Mountain and stayed with a cousin overnight who cooked a wonderful meal. And, later stayed at his place in Florida that included it’s own little swamp. DSC_3000

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Then headed elsewhere in Florida to catch up with some other van-dwellers roaming around in the warm weather. At Goose Pasture, Layla and Libby had a lot of fun playing and digging.  Yes, that’s our dirty-faced girl.DSC_2928And we caught up with Cuzzin’ Dyck there along with Trisha. DSC_2921The time at Goose Pasture camp was good. It also allowed me to catch a few sound bites for a future project. I’ll drop the hint that it’s another meditation audio track based on this clip from a friend.  Click hear for a taste… Forest flute extended.

We moved from there to a piece of private property and then on to stay nearer the coast. Once again since our plans are always “etched in jello” even that changed. We made a stop at another vandwellers nicely wooded lot and enjoyed seeing Robert again.

Time to “leapity leap” as Brenda says…
I think our next stop was… who am I fooling? I honestly don’t remember.

We cruised the Gulf coast of Florida on the way to Fort Mims, Alabama to meet up with some real characters. 17545582_10212805585914048_4122971939332103596_o These guys are some of the historic actors that present living history at various places and events.
And that’s where I’m going to pick up next time.

SO, as always…

“Get out, Be safe, and Go adventure.”

Striking out on the road.

We began our full-time road adventure by heading south.  While some folks may ask why south?  Those that know us simply reply it is February.  Which means we are going to dodge the cold and snow.

As we were leaving Kentucky we took a small detour and went to Levi Jackson State Park near London Ky.  I wanted to see the McHargue Mill.

I have a fascination with grist or grinding mills.  Both Brenda and I have mills in our family history.  Cordray, GA was a community built around the grist mill my great grandfather owned.  While Brenda’s family, on her mother’s side, came from Switzerland and started flour mills on the east coast. cord_101a We posted pictures of the McHargue’s mill both on Facebook and Instagram.  If you visit Instagram search for @twentyonefeathers and check my albums on Facebook under Dan Cordray.

We thought we would stop and see the Etowah Indian mounds near Cartersville.DSC_2873However the mounds site was not open that day.  Which led to a walkaround and the discovery of a really nice looking courthouse.

Our travels will be taking on a route through Atlanta where we will visit one of my cousins but also Kennesaw Mountain.

So, just as Gen. Sherman may have said, “On to Atlanta…”

Until next time…

“Get Out, Be Safe, and Go Adventure”

 

Fort Jackson, GA

Today we found ourselves following a path less traveled that led to a fort many have never heard of, named Fort Jackson.dsc_2845 This fort was built in 1808 as a position to defend Savannah from attack by sea.   This early spot in history makes it the oldest brick fortification in Georgia.  In 1812, the rest of the “world” was at war.  Two of our biggest trade partners at that time were England and France.

We bought and sold many goods that were shipped out of the port at Savannah.  So, the need to protect the bay entrance became more important.

The next battle action this fort saw was during the Civil War in 1862 when it was shelled by an  escaped slave named Robert Smalls.

Shortly after the evacuation of Savannah, and the surrender that followed,  William T. Sherman captured Savannah by land.  On December 20, 1864 the fort fell to Union hands.  The fort, like Savannah, was also evacuated and the subsequent surrender avoided major bloodshed at the fort.

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Due to Sherman refusing to use black troops in the war, the 55th Massachusetts Regiment remained garrisoned there.   Because of its history there have been many flags over this fort.  giphy-1From 1884-1905 it was known as Fort Oglethorpe and saw little use by the military.  In 1924 the city of Savannah purchased the fort for use as a park, but it was not restored until some 46 years later.  Today, the Coastal Heritage Society maintains the fort and provides tours.  Visit their website here… Coastal Heritage Society.

During the tour of the fort you can expect twice a day firing of a cannon at 11:00am and 2:00pm, along with a presentation given to us by Daniel McCall about the history of the fort.  His knowledge and ease of presentation made the visit come alive.

Thanks for travelling along with Brenda and I as we wandered north through Georgia.

As always…

Get Out, Be Safe, and Go Adventure.

Singing Bowl

On our trip to visit friends and family in Texas I had the chance to not only record but also to play a Tibetan Singing Bowl.  While it was fascinating to get the chance to play this instrument of meditation, I wasn’t clear of its origin or original purpose.  So, after doing a little research here’s one of the better articles I found.  It is an interview between Rain Gray and Lama Lobsang Molam, a Tibetan monk born in Lhasa, Tibet.

Here’s the Link… Interview with Rain Gray

Brenda’s friend Donna was delighted to see an old friend, and get the chance to play the bowl for me.

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It was a great time of sharing stories and past histories and watching these two laugh and enjoy each others’ company.  It was a real delight to hear and watch Donna make the bowl sing.  We were recording in her meditation room, a special place set aside for renewal of the spirit.  I want to tell her thank-you for allowing me to use her space for recording.  I think that recording in this energy filled room made it extra special.
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After hearing the beautiful tones the bowl produced in her hands I asked if I could try and make it sing.

 It was a very soothing experience holding the bowl as it produced the tones while I tried to follow her form.    Of course I had to experiment with mic placement, setting the bowl on different surfaces, techniques, and in the end holding it in my hand produced the best sound. And, the best feeling while the bowl sang to me.

What a great time we had producing a recorded loop of the bowl for meditation purposes.  I’m putting the loop in the “Road Noise” section of the blog.  Here’s a link to the recording that is about 30 minutes long.

Once again until next time…

“Get Out, Be Safe, and Go Adventure”

A Quick Weekend Out..

This last weekend was one that basically directed itself.  We started out to the Mountain Bushcrafters Alliance skills day and wherever the van rolled from there.

I’m going to share these wanderings in a couple of posts here since the activities were totally random and therefore unrelated to each other.  We started at a gathering of folks that share a love of doing things “the old fashion way” while teaching each other how to “go farther and stay longer”.  Then moved into a study of early folk dance and from there a PowWow gathering of 5 or 6 tribes being represented.

Understand that the only planned stop was the MBA skills day the other two were literally where the van rolled. We left the MBA gathering and spent the night on the road (aka Marathon/Wendy’s parking lot).

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I couldn’t resist posting this sign from inside.

We decided to head further north and find what we could get into…  But, first a shady spot to fix breakfast.

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This was the best shade I could find.  Amazing nobody came to ask what we were doing there.  They could have gotten coffee or a free meal!

We decided to check out Berea, KY to see if anything was going on there.  Since it was Sunday the streets were pretty much empty and the sidewalks were still rolled up.  We did stop in at the Russel Acton Folk Center.

“The Russel Acton Folk Center was built and owned by a group of volunteers, with the help of many generous donations, in the mid 1980’s. The dream of its namesake, Russel Acton, was to preserve the art of Folk Dancing in Appalachia.” — Facebook/ Russel Acton Center

Here’s a sample of some of the activities to preserve and promote our heritage in dance.

I myself resemble a three-legged gazelle when it comes to dancing so the next clip fascinated me with the grace of this waltz…

They were having a short session and we arrived after they started so that’s all I was able to video.  And I want to say thanks to everyone to allow me the chance to video.

Let’s see what’s next…

The next post I’ll back up and share some scenes from the MBA skills day.

 

Until next time…

“Get Out, Be Safe, and Go Adventure.”

Scotch Eggs

So I saw this recipe on the James Townsend and Sons website where they make it look so easy and decided I gotta try it.  So here we go!  Let’s mince up some ham, country ham and fresh eggs would be better since they don’t require refrigeration.

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While four eggs are on to hard boil I started on mincing the ham.  In this case I’m running some packaged city ham through the grinder to create ham mince.  This could be done by hand with knife and mashing tool.  But, today I have solar panels to work on and utilized some tools for shortcuts.   😉

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Doesn’t that look nice?  That’s about two cups of minced ham.
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I added one egg.  Next time I use city ham with “water added” I’ll be adding two eggs.  The egg is just a binder for holding the ham together.
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Now wrap the ham mince around the hard-boiled eggs for a coating of about 1/2 inch or so.
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This is the setup, today I’ll be using the rocket stove with the same trivet I use in my Dutch oven.  The trivet raises the pan to help reduce the hot spot in the middle.
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Lessons learned here?  Make sure the oil or other cooking medium is up to temp before putting in because you’re gonna be rolling these and setting the ham coating fairly quickly.  Also, take the extra time to be sure your cooking surface is actually level.
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There ya go…  Nice brown Scotch Eggs.  I added no salt, pepper or other seasoning.  The ingredients are simply minced ham and eggs.
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And here’s what they look like on the plate.
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Sorry, close to the last bite.  I hope you enjoyed.

So until we cook and dine again…